Self-Publishing Part 9: The Galley Proof, and of Course, It Gets Even Worse

Going it Mostly Alone: the Publishing Path of A Perfect Blindness

 

Since I knew I had made a lot of references, and suspected they could be fun to list or reveal somehow or use as a game of sorts, deep into the life cycle of its marketing, I had marked them as I revised. In Scrivener, the software used to write the manuscript, I took advantage of the commenting function, which allowed me to quickly find each one, in order and in context. Read More

Self-Publishing Part 9: The Galley Proof, and of Course, More T​rouble

Going it Mostly Alone: the Publishing Path of A Perfect Blindness

The road to publication still had a few twists to ride out, starting with the final proof having problems that needed fixing before I could check the accept box. A Perfect Blindness is about, on the surface, two close friends and their escape to Chicago to finally make it with a band. They found a new band called Mercurial Visions, and much of the narrative backbone unifying the three interweaving stories follow the fortunes of the band. Music is the milieu, and as such, the text is drenched in music: songs play when they are in their loft when they go out to the bars, and clubs, and even in their thoughts. Sometimes references spill from their mouths in phrases or entire sentences, either verbatim lines or riffs based on lyrics of songs from the era. Mostly. A couple of references are anachronistic, coming from songs after this time, but they are kindred. Read More

Self-Publishing Part 9: The Galley Proof, a Pause Before Publication, and a Last Few Thoughts on Paying to do it​

Going it Mostly Alone: the Publishing Path of A Perfect Blindness

A bit over a year after I’d submitted the manuscript, I got an email with the fully formatted, ready to go to print files. Felt good. Color cover. Well laid out type inside.

Damn that feels so good. Read More

Self-Publishing Part 8: While Still Preparing the Book, a Seedling Platform Weighs Other Benefits of Paying for Publishing a Book

Going it Mostly Alone: the Publishing Path of A Perfect Blindness

Part of the appeal of self-publishing is writer control: the author can publish the book they wrote in whatever shape they wish, from rough draft to fully polished or any state in between. A writer can call it whatever genera they care, and fill it with idiosyncratic grammar, such as using then as a coordinating conjunction. No editor will command something be done, or it won’t get published—the prohibitions of defamation, plagiarism, and explicit underage sex and drug use excepted. Read More

Self-Publishing Part 8: While Still Preparing the Book, a Seedling Platform Gets a Grip on Funding its Own Book

Going it Mostly Alone: the Publishing Path of A Perfect Blindness

For A Perfect Blindness, my wife and I put the money up: The editors have all been paid, and the risk—will it make or lose money—is all ours. There are different ways to view the choice to pay to take my book through all the steps of the Traditional Publishing Path, from initial evaluation to Developmental editing, and through Content editing, Quality review, Design all the way to final Proofreading. Read More

Self-Publishing Part 8: While Still Preparing the Book, a Seedling Platform Puts Price into Some Perspective

Going it Mostly Alone: the Publishing Path of A Perfect Blindness

 

Of course, publishing a high-quality book has never been cheap. Once Gutenberg gave the Europe movable type in the 15th century, the first mass-published books were religious texts, including the Bible (in many cases in the local language and not Latin for the first time), costing 30 Florins—the equivalent of three years of wages for a clerk—and then the Greek and Roman classics: Important books for important and wealthy people. The literate wealthy could fund their works of science, poetry, and fiction, but these were for their peers—these works were fantastically expensive, and most of the public was illiterate anyway. Read More

Self-Publishing Part 8: While Still Preparing the Book, How a Seedling Platform Aims for an Agent, P​roper

Going it Mostly Alone: the Publishing Path of A Perfect Blindness

As iUniverse is the only self-publishing company that currently offers this alternative entrance to the Traditional Publishing Path, all the requirements for such are their own. Read More

Self-Publishing Part 8: While Still Preparing the Book, a Seedling Platform Aims for an Agent, Proper

Going it Mostly Alone: the Publishing Path of A Perfect Blindness

Each iUniverse STAR title gets a personal agent: the iUniverse STAR Program’s Rights Consultant, a veteran of the book publishing industry. This person presents the book to traditional publishing houses, international publishers, audiobook publishers and book clubs for their consideration. But unlike in the old model of peddling mere manuscripts, when this first gatekeeper, the agent, had to have been approached by a writer, who had convinced the agent that not only did a manuscript have potential, and that there was a market for said manuscript, and that the author was someone the agent, and by extension the publisher, could work with to get that manuscript into the best shape possible, and then would continue to work with the publisher to sell the book after publication. Read More

Self-Publishing Part 8: While Still Preparing the Book, a Seedling Platform Aims for a Star

Going it Mostly Alone: the Publishing Path of A Perfect Blindness

With the Star designation, iUniverse commits further resources to the book, effectively completing an entirely new, author-controlled onramp to the Traditional Publishing Path.

First, the cover gets reassessed. Not only has this book met industry standards in writing quality and shown a market exists for it, but the book has reached the market and demonstrated an actual demand exists for it. The book has proven it can sell. To make sure the book looks like the seller it is, the cover gets a second Cover Copy Polish. This would include, if necessary a professional editing of the back cover copy and author bio, possibly adding blurbs from reviews it might have gotten, as well as another turn through design, including, at the very least, a new ISBN and a new colophon:

Copy of 230px x 73px – Star designation

The logo changes color, again dependent upon the book’s actual cover, and transforms into a star; the swoop up remains; the matching color dot returns atop the i, and as the book and its author are no longer merely rising, the single word Star appears below iUniverse.  Read More

Self-Publishing Part 8: While Still Preparing the Book, Finding a Major Mistake on the Cover

Going it Mostly Alone: the Publishing Path of A Perfect Blindness

Sure, the cover looked great. The designers followed my instructions and did a bang up job: Only with the wrong central image.

The problem was that for months I’d been using cover1 to mean a particular image. It was labeled cover1 on FaceBook, labeled cover1 on my desktop. I’d gotten used to cover1 meaning my favorite cover. Period.

But the designers changed my favorite cover’s name to coveralt1 and using cover1 for a different image, so when I directed them to use cover 1 (what had been my and most other people’s favorite), I had inadvertently directed them to use the wrong cover image.

ACK! Read More

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